Fullscreen vs. Widescreen

October 9, 2005 – 12:26 am | by Bill

I’ve always wondered about which one shows more of the picture. This article uses Star Wars as an example. I never knew that sometimes that much of the picture got cut off, but apparently it does. It is not always an important part of the movie however, but sometimes we can miss stuff because of it.

Lesson: Always rent/buy widescreen, even if you have a fullscreen tv.

  1. 3 Responses to “Fullscreen vs. Widescreen”

  2. By jeff on Jun 16, 2007 | Reply

    Actually, I’m almost positive that fullscreen has more picture. I have The Mask on DVD and it has both the fullscreen and widescreen versions. I compared the two at the same frame and the widescreen version was missing the top and bottom, rather than the fullcreen missing the left and right. But maybe it’s different for different movies.

  3. By Bill on Jun 17, 2007 | Reply

    Hmm, I guess it is different, for different movies. I’ve seen some movies that have more stuff on the left/right sides for widescreen, whereas the fullscreen version pretty much zooms in and cuts the sides off.

  4. By Michael on Jul 14, 2008 | Reply

    I think Jeff is wrong. If he had “the mask” that had both fullscreen and widescreen formats, chances are that if you press play two images will be shown to compare the two formats. But they display it wrong, the fullscreen version seems to be complete and the widescreen version cuts off the top and bottom. This is probably how jeff made his experiment. I borrowed the movie “underdog” and it was the same, it displayed the two formats and fullscreen seems to have way more picture, but when I actually compared both formats, widescreen still had more picture. Ex. fullscreen-the dog flies and carries the boy while the camera zooms on the dog and then down on the boy. widescreen-same as fullscreen but shows the atmosphere and the sky at the sides. I compared other scenes and concluded that widescreen showed a much farther perspective than fullscreen.

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