Archive for October, 2006

Midterm Results

Monday, October 30th, 2006

This morning I walked into class and was surprised to find the class average was above a failing mark. At BCIT, the failing mark is 70%, not 50%. For the PC Hardware exam, I got 90%, and for the ‘Introduction to Operating Systems’ exam I got 70%.

In other school related news, in an earlier post I mentioned that I have a bonus project on AMD’s HyperTransport technology. I was under the impression that it was a written report, but it is actually a written report, with a presentation. Due this friday. So I need to get working! :)

Half Life 2 Episode 1

Sunday, October 29th, 2006

I finally got around to playing Half Life 2 Episode 1. Even though it is a short game, the HDR and graphics were awesome. I know that there are more Half Life 2 episodes coming out, but I also hope that they have another team working on Half Life 3.

I’m looking forward to playing Tom Clancys Splinter Cell: Double Agent. I’ve only played one of the Splinter Cell games in the past, and although I enjoyed it, I never really got into the series. Double Agent sounds different though, I am looking forward to trying the Co-op mode.

Midterms

Friday, October 27th, 2006

Last night I watched Studio 60 on the Sunset Strip Episode 6 (Season 1). I think it’s my favorite episode of the show so far. My favorite part of the episode is when they figure out that the old guy used to work at the station, and he starts telling Matt and Danny about his past.

Today I wrote my A+ (PC Hardware) and Introduction to Operating Systems midterms. I’m sure I did well on the A+ midterm, unsure about the OS midterm. The format of each exam was 40 multiple choice questions, 5 essay questions, and 1 bonus question, so it is hard to tell how well I did.

I need to get started on a bonus assignment that my professor assigned to two of us. The bonus assignment consists of a report on AMD’s HyperTransport technology, and how it works. I may post it here when I am finished.
I’ve been using Microsoft OneNote 2003 to take notes in class. I have a special page for terms in the PC hardware book, which I enter as I am reading the book. The other night I was in an IRC channel, and I found that someone had put the whole glossary on his website. I may use his glossary instead of doing it myself.

My professor mentioned that we should use flash cards, and that he knows people who have paid $50 for a good set of flash cards. I thought about creating a good set in a .pdf file, and selling the .pdf file to other BCIT students, but I did a Google search for flash cards. I found this website, and it has lists of flash cards. You can create them and view them online for no charge, but to print them you will have to pay a life-time membership fee of $19.95. If anyone knows a similar website that offers this service for free, please let me know. Flash cards really do help!

24 Trailer

Tuesday, October 24th, 2006

For those of you that follow the tv series 24, you can check out the season six trailer here.

Parallels RC 2.2 Followup

Wednesday, October 11th, 2006

Tried the Battlefield 2142 demo today, wasn’t too impressed. It is way too futureistic for me, and I’m not into that. Seems more like the style of Mechwarrior. Although, driving around in one of those vehicles with two legs was cool - at first. I will stick to Counter-Strike Source for now.

The following is a followup to my previous post.

So Parellels RC 2.2 rocks. I used Slackware 11, Backtrack 1.0, and Ubuntu. Since Backtrack 1.0 and Ubuntu are livecds by default, they were very easy to run in the Parallels installation. I did not end up getting Slackware 11 to work, I messed up while i was partitioning I think, and I do not feel like fixing it.

Backtrack and Ubuntu worked great, although I did not get network/internet connectivity in Backtrack for some reason. I would have really liked this, so I could use Backtracks tools with my wifi card, without downloading them in another livecd such as Ubuntu. Ubuntu worked great, was very fast, and the internet worked fine.

Parallels will theoretically work great on computers with wifi cards, because a lot of wifi card manufacturer drivers do not natively support linux, which can be a problem for people with wifi cards, especially when you are a mobile laptop user. Parellels bridges your internet connection between your main OS and the virtual OS. So you could run Windows XP Pro, and in Parallels be running Ubuntu and use your wifi card.

Screenshot of my Slackware 11 installation on Parallels RC 2.2

Slackware 11

Friday, October 6th, 2006

With the recent release of Slackware 11, I decided to download and install the dvd iso using Microsoft Virtual PC 2004. I got a copy of Virtual PC for free from Microsoft and my school, so I figured I would use it. I go ahead and download it, and install it, and upon trying to load the .iso, it spits out an error about it not being a valid CD image. Apparently it does not like dvd isos.

I go ahead and download VMware, the competitor of Virtual PC. After I installed it, I got a tip from an irc chatroom that Parallels has a version for Windows, and that it’s better then VMware and Virtual PC. So I download Parallels and install it, and set it up.

Parellels RC 2.2 seems to be working great. Before tonight I had never manually configured linux partitions before, so I learned some stuff. :) All in all, it’s fairly easy.

Going to go finish installing Slackware 11, I may post back later with screenshots. =)